What is a Face Oil? Dry Skin Care

Posted by Dr. Natasha Ryz on

A face oil is an oil-based skincare product that has benefits for your skin.

A simple face oil may be composed of a single oil, whereas a more complex face oil may contain several plant carrier oils, as well as extracts, actives and essential oils.

Different face oils have different properties, including textures, aromas, colors, skin feel and skin benefits.

Face oils leave your skin feeling soft, nourished and plump. 

This article will discuss:

    • What is a face oil?
    • Face oil vs. facial oil
    • What are face oils made of?
    • What are the active nutrients in face oils?
    • What are benefits of face oils?
    • How to use a face oil
    • Who should use a face oil
    • Summary
    • References

What is a Face Oil?

What is a face oil?

A face oil is an oil-based skincare product that can soften, condition and soothe your skin.

A face oil is made from plant-based carrier oils, and may also include mineral oils, animal-based oils, and/or esters. 

A simple face oil may be composed of a single plant carrier oil, whereas a more complex face oil may contain several plant carrier oils, as well as extracts, actives and essential oils.

Plant oils are rich in essential nutrients including fatty acids, vitamins and antioxidants that nourish and protect your skin.

There are face oils that are created for different skin types and concerns, including dry skin, mature skin, sensitive skin or acne prone skin.

Face oils are designed to be used on your face and neck area.

What is a Face Oil?

Face oil vs. facial oil

Is there a difference between face oils and facial oils?

Not really...

"Face oil" and "facial oil" are terms often used interchangeably in the skincare industry, referring to the same type of product. Both terms describe a concentrated blend of oils formulated to provide benefits to the skin on the face. 

What is a Face Oil?

What is a face oil made of?

A face oil is made from plant-based carrier oils, and may also include mineral oils, animal-based oils, and/or esters. 

Most face oils do not contain water or water-soluble ingredients. Unlike moisturizers that often contain a mixture of water and oil, face oils are predominantly composed of oils and oil-soluble ingredients.

A simple face oil may be composed of a single plant carrier oil, whereas a more complex face oil may contain several plant carrier oils, as well as extracts, actives and essential oils. 

Plant-based carrier oils be extracted from nuts, grains, seeds, fruit and berries.

Some plant carrier oils in face oils may include:

For dry skin:

  • Apple seed oil
  • Rice bran oil
  • Jojoba seed oil
  • Virgin coconut oil

For all skin types:

  • Sunflower seed oil
  • Hemp seed oil

Different plant carrier oils have different properties, including textures, aromas, colors, skin feel, nutrient profiles and benefits.

Apple Seed Oil

Apple seed oil

Apple seed oil smells heavenly - like fresh apples and a hint of marzipan. 

Apple seed oil is cold pressed from seeds that would otherwise go to waste in the juice industry and is considered a ‘zero waste’ seed oil. 

Cold-pressed apple seed oil is nutrient-rich and is packed with fatty acids, vitamins, polyphenols, phytosterols and other antioxidants (Fromm et al, 2012; Walia et al, 2014; Górnas, 2015; Pieszka et al 2015).

Apple seed oil can soften your skin, strengthen your skin barrier and prevent free-radical damage.

Learn more: 4 Benefits of Apple Seed Oil for Your Dry Skin

Dry Skin Love Apple Elixir 5% Vitamin E Face Oil is made with organically crafted, cold-pressed apple seed oil. 

 

Wild Orange Oil Cleanser - Organic Ingredients

Rice bran oil

Rice bran oil is extracted from the bran or outer coat of the brown rice grain removed during the milling process.

Rice bran oil is unique due to its rich source of important antioxidants such as gamma- oryzanol, lecithin, and vitamin E - tocopherols and tocotrienols.

Rice bran oil contains 1-2% gamma-oryzanol, which has been reported to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity (Patel et al, 2004).

Rice bran oil is perfect for dry, flaky, sensitive, mature and delicate skin.

Learn more: Benefits of Rice Bran Oil for Dry Skin

Dry Skin Love Apple Elixir 5% Vitamin E Face Oil is made with refined rice bran oil that contains vitamin E and gamma-oryzanol.

Wild Orange Oil Cleanser - Organic Ingredients

Jojoba oil

Jojoba oil is a unique oil that is made of liquid wax esters that are similar to the natural esters produced by the sebaceous glands in your skin (Wertz, 2009).

Jojoba oil is highly emollient, non-greasy and quickly absorbed, leaving your skin with a silky feel. 

Learn more: What is Jojoba Oil?

Dry Skin Love Apple Elixir 5% Vitamin E Face Oil contains cold-pressed organic golden jojoba seed oil.

Virgin Coconut Oil

Virgin coconut oil

Virgin coconut oil has a strong natural coconut aroma that is buttery and sweet, and easily absorbed into your skin.

Virgin coconut oil initially creates an oily, protective barrier on the skin, which is then absorbed fairly quickly, leaving your skin feeling soft and plump.

Virgin coconut oil is nutrient-packed and has many benefits for dry skin.

Learn more: 5 Benefits of Virgin Coconut Oil for Your Dry Skin 

Dry Skin Love Apple Elixir 5% Vitamin E Face Oil contains organic extra virgin coconut oil that is cold-pressed and unrefined. Our coconut oil is Fair Trade and comes from a sustainable source.

What is a Face Oil?

What are the active nutrients in face oils?

Face oils that contain plant oils are rich in active nutrients including fatty acids, squalene, vitamins, carotenoids, phytosterols, polyphenols and other bioactive compounds that have benefits for your skin.

The active nutrients of face oils may include:

    • Fatty acids
    • Squalene and squalane
    • Vitamin E - tocopherols and tocotrienols
    • Vitamin K - phylloquinone
    • Carotenoids
    • Phytosterols
    • Polyphenols

Learn more: Face Oils Contain Active Nutrients

What is a Face Oil?

What are the benefits of face oils?

Face oils have many benefits for your skin, they can infuse your skin with essential nutrients, soften and condition your skin, strengthen your skin barrier, calm irritation and protect your skin from daily damage.

There are 5 key benefits of face oils:

    1. Face oils infuse your skin with nutrients
    2. Face oils soften and condition your skin
    3. Face oils strengthen your skin barrier
    4. Face oils calm your skin
    5. Face oils protect your skin

Face oils can have many benefits for your skin depending on their formulation.

Learn more: 5 Benefits of Face Oils for Dry Skin

Face oils infuse your skin with nutrients

As you age, several changes in your skin occurs.

Your skin barrier becomes weaker.

Your skin makes less lipids, fatty acids, vitamins and antioxidants.

Specifically, as you age, your skin makes less:

    • lipids
    • stearic acid
    • palmitic acid
    • linoleic acid (n-6)
    • vitamin E
    • squalene
    • ubiquinone (coenzyme Q10)

(Ghadially et al, 1995; Ghadially et al, 1996; Passi et al, 2003; Kim et al, 2010).

Learn more: How Does Aging Change Your Skin?

Fortunately, these beneficial nutrients can be found in plant carrier oils.

Plant carrier oils be extracted from nuts, grains, seeds, fruit and berries.

Face oils that contain plant carrier oils are rich in fatty acids, squalene, vitamins and other bioactive compounds.

Face oils rich in plant carrier oils can infuse your skin with essential nutrients.

What is a Face Oil?

How to use a face oil?

Face oils are designed to be used on your face and neck area, but can also be applied to your lips, eye area, chest and hands. 

Most face oils can be applied day and night, but it depends on the ingredients in the final formula.

Directions:

  1. Start with clean hands and face.
  2. Apply a few drops of face oil into your clean hands.
  3. Try 2-3 drops to start. You can always add more.
  4. Gently rub face oil together in your hands and then apply face oil onto your clean face and neck.
  5. Gently massage into your face and neck until face oil is absorbed.
  6. All a few minutes for any excess face oil to absorb.
  7. If you add too much face oil, simply dab off excess with a clean tissue.
  8. Enjoy your soft, nourished and protected skin.

Who should use a face oil?

Who should use a face oil?

Face oils are great for all skin types, but especially dry skin.

There are face oils that are created for different skin types and concerns, including dry skin, mature skin, sensitive skin or acne prone skin.

Face Oil

Summary

A face oil is made from plant-based oils, and may also include mineral oils, animal-based oils, and/or esters. 

A simple face oil may be composed of a single plant oil, whereas a more complex face oil may contain several plant oils, as well as extracts, actives and essential oils.

Face oils have many benefits for your skin depending on their formulation.

Face oils can soften your skin, improve the texture of your skin, reduce fine lines, calm redness and irritation and protect your skin from daily damage.

Face oils are great for all skin types, but especially dry skin.

Dry Skin Love Apple Elixir 5% Vitamin E Face Oil is launching soon!

Sign up for our Waitlist below to stay updated.

     Apple Seed Oil

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    Author Information

    Dr. Natasha Ryz, Scientist and Founder of Dry Skin Love Skincare

    Dr. Natasha Ryz is a scientist, skin care expert and an entrepreneur. She is the founder of Dry Skin Love Skincare, and she creates skincare products for beauty, dry skin and pain relief.

    Dr. Ryz has a PhD in Experimental Medicine from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, and she is a Vanier scholar. She also holds a Master of Science degree and a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg.

    Natasha is the former Chief Science Officer of Zenabis Global, and she oversaw extraction, analytics, and product development. Her team brought 20 products to market including oils, sprays, vapes and softgels.

    Why I Started A Skincare Company

    Email: natasha.ryz@dryskinlove.com
    Twitter: @tashryz
    Instagram: @tash.ryz
    LinkedIn: @natasharyz

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