What is Pineapple Seed Oil?

Posted by Dr. Natasha Ryz on

Pineapple seed oil is made by crushing pineapple seeds and collecting the oil.

Pineapple seed oil is rich in nutrients, including essential fatty acids, and has many benefits for your skin.

This article with discuss:

    • What is pineapple seed oil?
    • How is pineapple seed oil made?
    • What does pineapple seed oil smell like?
    • What color is pineapple seed oil?
    • What does pineapple seed oil feel like?
    • What is the composition of pineapple seed oil?
    • Summary
    • References

Our Dry Skin Love Brightening Pineapple 10% Vitamin C Face Oil is made with cold-pressed pineapple seed oil from the Philippines.

Pineapple Seed Oil

What is pineapple seed oil?

INCI: Ananas comosus (Pineapple) Seed Oil
Extraction Method: cold pressed, cold filtered
Appearance: light to pale yellow
Texture: lightweight, easily absorbed into skin
Aroma: light, fresh, fruity aromatic oil

Pineapple seed oil is made by crushing pineapple seeds and collecting the oil.

Pineapple seeds are small black or brown flecks that can be found throughout the fruit and below the skin or the fruit

Pineapple seed oil is cold-pressed from seeds that would otherwise go to waste and is considered a ‘zero waste’ seed oil. 

Fruit seeds are a major by-products of the food industry, and creating new uses for them by converting them to value-added products helps to prevent their disposal as waste, and promotes sustainable production.

Pineapple seed oil is rich in essential nutrients, including essential fatty acids, and has many benefits for your skin.

Pineapple seed oil

How is pineapple seed oil made?

Pineapple seed oil is not as commonly produced or well-known as some other plant seed oils, but it can be extracted from the seeds of pineapples. Here's a general overview of how pineapple seed oil is made:

  1. Seed Collection: Pineapple seeds are obtained from ripe pineapples. 

  2. Cleaning and Drying: The collected seeds are cleaned to remove any fruit residue and then dried to reduce moisture content. 

  3. Seed Extraction: There are a few methods for extracting oil from pineapple seeds, including cold pressing and solvent extraction:

    a. Cold Pressing: This method involves mechanically pressing the dried seeds to extract the oil. The seeds are typically ground into a paste, and then the paste is subjected to hydraulic pressure to squeeze out the oil. Cold pressing is considered a more natural and less heat-intensive method, which helps preserve the oil's nutritional value.

    b. Solvent Extraction: In this method, a solvent like hexane is used to extract the oil from the seeds. The solvent dissolves the oil, and then the solvent-oil mixture is separated. The solvent is usually removed through evaporation, leaving behind the oil.

  4. Filtration: Regardless of the extraction method used, the resulting oil may contain impurities and sediment. It is typically filtered to remove these impurities and obtain a clean, clear oil.

  5. Refining (Optional): Depending on the desired quality and application of the oil, further refining processes may be employed. These processes can include degumming, neutralization, and deodorization to improve the oil's flavor, color, and shelf life.

The exact production process may vary depending on the manufacturer or specific equipment used.

What is pineapple seed oil?

What does pineapple seed oil smell like?

Pineapple seed oil has a delightful aroma that is sweet, fruity, and reminiscent of freshly cut pineapple.

The oil carries the natural scent of fresh pineapple, with a blend of sweetness and a slightly tart or tangy note.

The aroma of pineapple seed oil is pleasant and calming and evokes feelings of freshness and summertime.

The intensity and specific scent of pineapple seed oil may vary depending on the quality of the seeds, the extraction process, and any additional processing or refining steps involved in the production of the oil.

Cold-pressed, unrefined pineapple seed oil has the strongest aroma, whereas processed oil has a faint aroma.

Pineapple seed oil

What color is pineapple seed oil?

The color of pineapple seed oil depends on how the seeds are processed and how the finished oil is refined. 

Cold-pressed, unrefined pineapple seed oil is light pale yellow to golden colored.

 Pineapple Seed Oil

What does pineapple seed oil feel like on your skin?

Pineapple seed oil has a light and silky texture, making it pleasant to apply on the skin. It is lightweight and easily absorbed, without leaving a heavy or greasy residue. The texture is generally smooth, allowing for smooth application and even distribution on the skin.

When applied, pineapple seed oil imparts a moisturizing and hydrating sensation. It can leave the skin feeling soft, supple, and nourished. The oil absorbs relatively quickly into the skin, making it suitable for both facial and body use.

 Pineapple Seed Oil

What is composition of pineapple seed oil?

Pineapple seed oil is composed of fatty acids that have benefits for skin.

Fatty acids are emollients and can soften your skin, help the skin retain its moisture and to support the skin’s barrier function.

Learn more: Benefits of Emollients for Dry Skin

Composition of pineapple seed oil:

    • 52 - 65% linoleic acid (C18:2, n-6)
    • 26 - 34% oleic acid (C18:0, n-9)
    • 4 - 10% palmitic acid (C16:0)
    • 1 - 5% stearic acid (C18:0)
    • 1 - 3% alpha-linolenic acid (n-3)
    • 1 - 3% arachidic acid (C20:0)

Linoleic acid

Pineapple seed oil contains 52 - 65% linoleic acid, an omega 6 fatty acid found naturally in your skin barrier.

Linoleic acid is an essential fatty acid that cannot be made by the body, and must be supplied through the diet, supplements and skincare. 

Linoleic acid has many benefits for your skin when applied topically. It softens your skin and strengthens your skin barrier. 

Learn more: What is Linoleic Acid? Omega 6 Essential Fatty Acid for Dry Skin

Oleic acid

Pineapple seed oil contains 26 - 34% oleic acid, an omega 9 fatty acid found naturally in your skin barrier and in sebum. 

Oleic acid has many benefits for dry skin when applied topically. It is quickly absorbed and softens dry skin.

Palmitic acid 

Pineapple seed oil contains 4 - 10% palmitic acid, a saturated fatty acid found naturally in your skin barrier. 

As you age, your skin barrier makes less palmitic acid (Kim et al, 2010).

Palmitic acid is a rich emollient as well as an occlusive agent, meaning it locks moisture into your skin rather than letting it evaporate.

Stearic acid

Pineapple seed oil contains 1 - 5% stearic acid.

Stearic acid is a saturated fatty acid found naturally in your skin barrier. 

As you age, your skin barrier makes less stearic acid (Kim et al, 2010). 

Stearic acid is a very rich fatty acid and forms an occlusive layer over the skin.

Alpha-linolenic acid

Pineapple seed oil contains 1 - 3% alpha-linolenic acid, an omega 3 fatty acid found naturally in your skin barrier.

Alpha-linolenic acid is an essential fatty acid that cannot be made by the body, and must be supplied through the diet, supplements and skincare. 

Learn more: Lipid Barrier: Beneficial Fats in Your Skin Barrier

Pineapple Seed Oil

Summary

Pineapple seed oil is made by crushing pineapple seeds and collecting the oil.

Pineapple seed oil is cold-pressed from seeds that would otherwise go to waste and is considered a ‘zero waste’ seed oil. 

Pineapple seed oil is rich in nutrients, including essential fatty acids and has many benefits for your skin.

Dry Skin Love Brightening Pineapple 10% Vitamin C Face Oil is made with cold-pressed pineapple seed oil from the Philippines.

Our pineapple seed oil has a delightful aroma that is fresh, fruity and sweet.

Our Dry Skin Love Brightening Pineapple 10% Vitamin C Face Oil is packed with nutrient-rich plant oils, including extra virgin coconut oil, cold-pressed pineapple seed oil and a gentle vitamin C ester to brighten your dry skin.

Our Brightening Pineapple 10% Vitamin C Face Oil is a luxurious face oil that makes your dry skin feel soft, plump and brightened.

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Pineapple Seed Oil

References

Breiden B., Sandhoff K. The role of sphingolipid metabolism in cutaneous permeability barrier formation. Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 2014;1841:441–452.

Cheng Y, Bartholomew D, Qin Y. Biology of the pineapple plant. Genetics and genomics of pineapple. 2018:27-40.

Hossain MF. World pineapple production: an overview. African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development. 16(4); Nov 2016.

Iyer CP, Singh R, Subramanyam MD. A simple method for rapid germination of pineapple seeds. Scientia Horticulturae. 1978; Jan 1;8(1):39-41.

Kim EJ, Kim MK, Jin XJ, Oh JH, Kim JE, Chung JH. Skin aging and photoaging alter fatty acids composition, including 11,14,17-eicosatrienoic acid, in the epidermis of human skin. J Korean Med Sci. 2010 Jun;25(6):980-3.

McCusker, et al. Healing fats of the skin: the structural and immunologic roles of the omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. Clin Dermatol. 2010 Jul-Aug;28(4):440-51.

Santa-María C, López-Enríquez S, Montserrat-de la Paz S, Geniz I, Reyes-Quiroz ME, Moreno M, Palomares F, Sobrino F, Alba G. Update on Anti-Inflammatory Molecular Mechanisms Induced by Oleic Acid. Nutrients. 2023 Jan 1;15(1):224.

Wee YC, Rao AN. Gametophytes and seed development in pineapple. Current Science. 1974 Mar 20;43(6):171-3.

Author Information

Dr. Natasha Ryz, Scientist and Founder of Dry Skin Love Skincare

Dr. Natasha Ryz is a scientist, skin care expert and an entrepreneur. She is the founder of Dry Skin Love Skincare, and she creates skincare products for beauty, dry skin and pain relief.

Dr. Ryz has a PhD in Experimental Medicine from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, and she is a Vanier scholar. She also holds a Master of Science degree and a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg.

Natasha is the former Chief Science Officer of Zenabis Global, and she oversaw extraction, analytics, and product development. Her team brought 20 products to market including oils, sprays, vapes and softgels.

Why I Started A Skincare Company

Email: natasha.ryz@dryskinlove.com
Twitter: @tashryz
Instagram: @tash.ryz
LinkedIn: @natasharyz

 

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