8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Calgary, Alberta

Posted by Dr. Natasha Ryz on

In Calgary, the winter weather is harsh and can wreak havoc on your skin.

Winter dry skin can have a wide spectrum of symptoms - from mild dryness and flaking to severe itching, redness and pain.

The treatment of winter dry skin can be simple or more complex, depending on the severity of dry skin symptoms.

This article will cover:

    • What is winter dry skin?
    • How to treat winter dry skin?
    • 8 tips for treating winter dry skin:
      • 1. Use a gentle cleanser for face and body
      • 2. Try an oil cleanser for face
      • 3. Use a moisturizer
      • 4. Wear sunscreen or sunblock
      • 5. Try slugging at night
      • 6. Use a humidifier in your home
      • 7. Take an omega-3 fatty acid supplement
      • 8. Protect your hands
    • Summary
    • References

    8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Calgary, Alberta

    What is winter dry skin?

    'Winter dry skin' is dry skin that develops during the cold winter season.

    Winter dry skin can have a wide spectrum of symptoms - from mild dryness and flaking to severe itching, redness and pain.

    Winter dry skin symptoms are painful and frustrating, and often associated with skin conditions such as eczema or atopic dermatitis. 

    Symptoms of winter dry skin include:

      • Loss of skin elasticity.
      • Skin feels tight, dehydrated.
      • Skin appears dull, rough and blotchy.
      • Slight to severe flaking, scaling or peeling.
      • Fine lines and wrinkles are more pronounced.
      • May have irritation and a burning sensation.
      • Mild to severe itching.

    Learn more: What is Dry Skin Pain?

    Winter dry skin has been reported to involve scaling, defects in water holding and barrier functions, and decreased lipid levels in the stratum corneum (Ishikawa et al, 2013).

    The following contribute to winter dry skin:

      • lack of water in skin
      • lack of water-holding substances called humectants (glycerin, hyaluronic acid, natural moisturizing factors)
      • lack of epidermal lipids (ceramides, fatty acids, cholesterol)
      • lack of sebum (triglycerides, wax esters, squalene)

    Learn more: Winter Dry Skin - What is it?

      8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Calgary, Alberta

      How to treat winter dry skin?

      Treating winter dry skin can be simple or more complex, depending on the severity of dry skin symptoms.

      Dry skin is often relieved with the use of moisturizers, and some lifestyle modifications, such as using a humidifier, avoiding harsh cleansers, and supplementing the diet with essential fatty acids.

      Very dry skin usually has underlying genetic components as well as environmental factors that play a role.

      Very dry skin does not typically respond to just moisturizers.

      Nutrient-rich oils, balms and barrier creams are required to improve very dry skin and protect against further damage.

      Active ingredients, including vitamins, humectants, and fatty acids can help repair the skin barrier, calm redness, and sooth irritation and itch.

      Some people with very dry skin may also require medications to control symptoms, including antimicrobial agents, antihistamines, anti-inflammatory agents, immunotherapy, biologicals, phototherapy, and others (reviewed by Armstrong et al, 2020, and Kulthanan et al, 2021).

      Talk to your doctor about treatments for dry skin.

      8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Calgary, Alberta

      8 tips for treating winter dry skin

      There are several helpful things to try if you are suffering from winter dry skin.

      To protect your skin during the cold winter months, it is recommended to follow a basic skincare routine, including a gentle cleanser, moisturizer and sunscreen.

      • 8 tips for treating winter dry skin:
        • 1. Use a gentle cleanser for face and body
        • 2. Try an oil cleanser for face
        • 3. Use a moisturizer
        • 4. Wear sunscreen or sunblock
        • 5. Try slugging at night
        • 6. Use a humidifier in your home
        • 7. Take an omega-3 fatty acid supplement
        • 8. Protect your hands

      If you have dry skin, you may require a dermatologist’s help, and they can prescribe medications to help with itching, redness and pain.

      8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Calgary, Alberta

      1. Use a gentle cleanser for your face and body

      Cleansing your skin is essential to keeping your dry skin healthy. 

      However, over cleansing or using the wrong type of cleanser can damage your skin barrier and worsen dry skin symptoms.

      Learn more: The Problem with Soap for Cleansing Dry Skin

      The main purpose of skin cleansing is to remove impurities from the skin’s surface, including make-up, dirt, grime, and daily skin debris. 

      There are many different types of cleansers that are beneficial for dry skin.

      For daily cleansing, there are many options, including syndets, cold creams, cleansing milks, cleansing oils, cleansing balms, micellar water and non-foaming cleansers.

      For removing heavy make-up and sunscreens, cleansing balms and cleansing oils are the best choice.

      These cleansers can all be formulated specifically for dry skin, as well as other skin types.

      Soaps and cleansers that are high in pH should be avoided, as high pH soaps can be irritating and disrupt the skin barrier.

      Learn more: 8 Types of Face Cleansers - Which Are Best for Cleansing Your Dry Skin?

      In addition to choosing a gentle cleanser, there are several other things to consider when cleansing your dry skin.

        • Avoid taking baths or showers using very hot water.
        • Avoid over-cleansing your dry skin.
        • Avoid over-scrubbing your dry skin. 
        • Avoid roughly towel-drying your dry skin.
        • Avoid chlorine exposure, in swimming pools and hot tubs. 

      Go slow and be very gentle when you cleanse your dry skin.

      8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Alberta, Canada. Dry Skin Love Wild Orange Oil to Milk Cleanser

      2. Try an oil cleanser

      Oil cleansing is very gentle on your skin and protects your skin barrier.

      What is oil cleansing?

      The oil cleansing method is a technique used to clean your face using oils. It works according to the principle of "like attracts like" as the oils help lift and remove daily sebum and oil build up, dirt and skin debris.

      Oil cleansing is very effective for gently removing oil-based and waterproof cosmetics, and sunscreens that cannot be easily removed with soap and water.

      The oil cleansing method is effective for cleansing skin and is safe to use daily.

      The oil cleansing method will not clog pores if the correct oil cleanser is used.

      Learn more: What is Oil Cleansing?

      What are the benefits of oil cleansing?

      Oil cleansing effectively cleanses your skin and removes all types of makeup and sunscreens effortlessly. 

      Oil cleansing doesn’t dry out your skin: You’re replenishing oils as you cleanse, instead of just stripping it away with soap.

      There are many beneficial fats and lipids that are naturally found in your skin barrier and play a critical role in keeping your skin healthy.

      Beneficial fats and lipids help to lubricate and coat your skin cells and nourish your skin.

      Learn more: Beneficial Fats Found in Your Skin Barrier

      Oil cleansers are packed with plant oils that are nutrient-rich and lubricating: They leave your skin so soft, and you may find, you don’t need a moisturizer afterwards.

      Learn more: 5 Benefits Cleansing Oil for Dry Skin

      8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Alberta, Canada

      What is an oil cleanser?

      An oil cleanser is made from plant-based oils, and may also include mineral oils, animal-based oils, and/or esters. 

      A simple oil cleanser may be composed of a single plant oil, whereas a more complex oil cleanser may contain several plant oils, as well as extracts, actives and aroma compounds.

      Different plant oils have different properties, including textures, aromas, colors, skin feel, nutrient profiles and benefits.

      8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Alberta, Canada. Dry Skin Love Wild Orange Oil to Milk Face Cleanser

      What is an oil to milk cleanser?

      An oil to milk cleanser is similar to an oil cleanser but is also contains an emulsifier to help it rinse away clean with water.

      Oil to milk cleansers can emulsify dirt, oil and microorganisms on the skin surface so that they can be easily removed with water. 

      Oil to milk cleansers rinse away clean, and do not leave a greasy feeling on your skin.

      Oil to milk cleansers leave your skin feeling clean, soft, and plump.

      Learn more: What is an Oil to Milk Cleanser?

      How to use an oil cleanser?

      An oil cleanser can be used as a face cleanser, a make-up remover and as a mask.

      For best results, always apply an oil cleanser to your dry skin (not even a little damp...)

      As a cleanser and make-up remover: With dry hands, apply a generous amount of oil cleanser, and massage into dry face and neck. Gently remove cleanser with a warm moistened cloth. Use daily as required.

      Can be used as a stand-alone cleanser, or as the first step oil cleanser in two step cleansing.

      As a mask: With dry hands, apply a generous amount of oil cleanser, and massage into dry face and neck. Let sit for 20 min and up to 1 hour. Gently remove cleanser with a warm moistened cloth.

      More info: 7 Ways to Use an Oil to Milk Cleanser for Dry Skin

        8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Alberta, Canada. Moisturizer

        3. Use a moisturizer

        A moisturizer is a skincare product, such as a cream or a lotion, that is used to prevent dryness in the skin.

        Moisturizers contain water and add moisture to the skin.

        Moisturizers also contain emollients, humectants and occlusives.

          • Emollients soften, smooth, and condition the skin.
          • Humectants attract and hold moisture to the skin.
          • Occlusives form a protective film that prevents moisture loss from the skin.

        The balance of these ingredients determines whether a moisturizer is better for dry skin or oily skin. For instance, a moisturizer for dry skin would contain a high percentage of emollients and occlusives.

        As the composition of moisturizers varies, the effectiveness of moisturizers can differ depending on the base ingredients and actives.

        Emollients can protect your lipid barrier

        The word emollient derives from the present participle of the Latin verb emollire, which means "to soften or soothe." Emollire, in turn, derives ultimately from mollis, meaning "soft." 

        Skincare ingredients that function as emollients include plant butters, vegetable and fruit oils, animal fats, and esters.

        Products that function as emollients include moisturizers, creams, oils, serums, and balms.

        An emollient is an ingredient in a moisturizer. The job of the emollient is to soften skin.

        Learn more: What are Emollients? Best Emollients for Dry Skin.

        8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Alberta, Canada

        What are the benefits of emollients?

        The function of emollients in skincare is to soften the skin, help the skin retain its moisture and to support the skin’s barrier function.

        Skin that does not have sufficient lipid content on its surface can appear dull, dry and rough. Emollients "fill in the gaps" in the skin barrier and soften it along with giving it a healthier look

        The role of emollients in the treatment of dry skin conditions is often underestimated. Emollients promote optimal skin health and prevent skin breakdown, and their use can improve quality of life (Moncrieff et al, 2013; Newton et al, 2021).

        Emollients are skin conditioning – the give skin a soft and smooth appearance, restoring suppleness and improving elasticity (Brown et al, 2005).

        Emollients:

          • Make your skin feel soft and smooth.
          • Help reduce flaking and roughness from dry skin.
          • Help assist the skin barrier by filling in gaps between cells.
        8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Alberta, Canada

        What is linoleic acid?

        Linoleic acid is an essential fatty acid found naturally in healthy skin.

        Linoleic acid is the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acid in the skin barrier (Ansari et al, 1970).

        Linoleic acid is also the precursor to ceramide synthesis (Breiden et al, 2014).

        As an essential component of ceramides, linoleic acid is involved in the maintenance of the transdermal water barrier of the epidermis (Whelan et al, 2013). 

        Linoleic acid can relieve symptoms of dry skin.

        Most of the free fatty acids can by synthesized by your skin cells and are released into the outer stratum corneum.

        However, linoleic acid is an essential fatty acid that must be provided externally through diet, supplements or topically through skincare products (Lin at al, 2017).

        Learn more: Linoleic Acid Omega 6 Fatty Acid - Benefits for Dry Skin

        8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Alberta, Canada

        What are humectants?

        Humectants attract and hold moisture to the skin.

        Humectants include natural moisturizing factors, hyaluronic acid, glycerol and urea. 

        Glycerol for dry skin

        Glycerol is also known as glycerin.

        The beneficial effects of glycerol on the skin have been recognized for over 75 years, and glycerol has been widely used as an ingredient of skincare formulations for its moisturizing and smoothing effects (Fluhr et al, 2008). 

        Topically applied glycerol is known to increase skin hydration, improve epidermal barrier function and decrease clinical signs of inflammation (Breternitz et al, 2008). 

        Topically applied glycerol has a rapid hydrating and smoothing effect that can be achieved at concentrations ranging from 10 to 15% (Loden et al, 2000).

        Urea for dry skin

        Urea is a hygroscopic molecule, meaning it can attract and hold onto moisture.

        Urea is used topically at 2 - 12% for the treatment and prevention of senile xerosis or xerosis associated with skin diseases such as ichthyosis, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis (Lacarrubba et al, 2020).

        8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Alberta, Canada

        What are occlusives?

        Occlusives are skincare ingredients or products that form a protective film that prevents moisture loss from the skin.

        They are usually oily or waxy. 

        Occlusives include:

          • Mineral oil
          • Petrolatum
          • Lanolin - from sheep's wool
          • Beeswax
          • Cocoa Butter
          • Jojoba oil

        Mineral oil and petrolatum are two of the most effective occlusive ingredients.

        Some ingredients that are emollients also have occlusive properties.

        For instance, cocoa butter is an emollient because it softens skin, and cocoa butter is also an occlusive because it forms protective barrier on your skin.

        8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Alberta, Canada

        4. Wear sunscreen and sunblock

        Ultraviolet (UV) exposure from sunlight can damage dry skin. 

        UV energy includes UVA, UVB and UVB radiation. Each component of UV can exert a variety of effects on cells, tissues and molecules (D'Orazio et al, 2013). 

        Chronic exposure to UV irradiation leads to photoaging (sunspots), immunosuppression, and ultimately skin cancer (Matsumura et al, 2004).

        In temperate latitudes, UV peaks on the summer solstice and is lowest at the winter solstice, though indirect, diffuse UV can still be high in winter. 

        While the UV Index can be high in early September it decreases quickly, and by the end of October it is much lower.

        UV exposure from the sun can worsen dry skin, and proper sunscreen or sunblock should be worn, especially when spending time outdoors. 

        Tips for Outside Environment

          • Wear sunblock/sunscreen (SPF 30 -60 on your face).
          • Protect your skin from exposure to the elements: cold, wind, sun.
          • Use a parasol or umbrella for protection against wind and sun.
          • Wear a face covering to protect against cold and wind.
          • Wear sunglasses to protect against sun exposure and wind.
          • Wear gloves, especially in cold weather.
        8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Alberta, Canada

        5. Use a humidifier in your home

        During winter, high indoor heat can reduce humidity and moisture in the air, causing dry skin. Heaters, fireplaces and wood-burning stoves can also contribute to low humidity.

        Dry air can be problematic for dry skin but using a humidifier can help improve dry skin by adding moisture back into the air.

        Humidifiers are devices that release water vapor or steam to increase moisture levels in the air - i.e., increase humidity. 

        It's best to keep indoor humidity levels between 30-50%.

        If the air in your home is too dry, then your dry skin will benefit from a humidifier.

        Low humidity can worsen dry skin

        Low humidity can cause a decrease in the water content of the skin barrier, causing decreased skin elasticity and increased skin roughness (Goad et al, 2016).

        Furthermore, when your skin is exposed to a dry environment, it could be more susceptible to mechanical stress and damage (Engebretsen et al, 2016). 

        Humidifiers can help soothe dry skin issues caused by dry indoor air.

        How does low humidity affect your skin during sleep?

        In a study, adult women were exposed to low humidity (30% relative humidity conditions) and high humidity (70% relative humidity) environments during their sleep cycle (Jang et al, 2019).

        After 7 hours of sleep-in low humidity, their skin hydration decreased by 24.23%, but there was no significant difference after sleeping in high humidity environment (Jang et al, 2019).

        The skin barrier integrity as measured by transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was significantly increased after facial cleansing, following sleep in low humidity environment (Jang et al, 2019).

        Furthermore, the sebum level was increased after sleep at low humidity (Jang et al, 2019)

        When sleeping in dry environment, skin hydration decreases but the amount of sebum increases to compensate for skin dryness (Jang et al, 2019). 

        What is best humidity level for skin?

        It is generally thought that humidity levels within occupied spaces should not exceed 60%, and when levels of humidity fall to around 30% or below, occupants begin to feel thermal discomfort (Goad et al, 2016).

        It has been shown that under 30% relative humidity, the eyes and skin become dry, and under 10% relative humidity the nasal mucous membrane becomes dry as well as the eyes and skin (Sunwoo et al, 2006). 

        How can a humidifier help your dry skin?

        In a hospital study, the introduction of humidifiers increased the relative humidity in sickrooms from 32.8% to 43.9% on average. 

        Complaints of thermal discomfort from the dry air (dry and itchy skin, thirst, etc.)  decreased among 45 staff members, though not among the 36 patients, after the humidifiers were installed. 

        These results suggest that introducing humidifiers into a hospital during winter is an effective method of improving the low-humidity environment and relieving the discomfort of staff members (Hashiguchi et al, 2008).

        However, patients in a hospital may require further care, in addition to humidifiers to notice significant changes to their dry skin.

        Overall, increased humidity levels can improve symptoms of dry skin.  

        8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Alberta, Canada. Slugging with petrolatum

        6. Try slugging at night

        "Slugging" is a viral beauty trend on TikTokTM that entails slathering a petrolatum-based ointment on the skin as a last step in your evening skincare routine (Pagani et al, 2022).

        The layer of petroleum jelly forms a protective barrier and acts as an occlusive.

        Occlusives are skincare ingredients or products that form a protective film that prevents moisture loss from the skin.

          Mineral oil and petrolatum are two of the most effective occlusive ingredients.

          Occlusives such as cocoa butter and soy butter can be effective for forming a protective barrier but may clog pores with long term use.

          Mineral oil and petrolatum are cost-effective and safe for long term use.

          Benefits of slugging

          Slugging leaves your skin feeling moisturized and plump.

          Slugging creates an occlusive layer and keeps water locked in your skin overnight.

          Keeping all that moisture in your skin can bring a dewy glow that makes your skin look and feel more youthful.

          Mineral oil and petrolatum have benefits for dry skin.

          Mineral oil was introduced as a cosmetic oil was in the late 1800s, and still today, it is used as one of the main components of moisturizers (Rawlings et al, 2012).

            Mineral oil has been shown to improve skin softness and skin barrier function and suppress transepidermal water loss (TEWL) (Rawlings et al, 2012).

            Applying petrolatum to the face has been shown to help reduce dryness and reduce exudate/crusting in people with eczema or atopic dermatitis (Murakami  et al, 2020).

            Furthermore, petrolatum was shown to decrease transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and significantly increase water content in the outer skin barrier (Murakami et al, 2020).

            How to slug?

            Slugging is pretty simple, apply a small pea sized amount of Vaseline or petroleum jelly over your face and neck before bed.

            To enhance the benefits of slugging it is often useful to apply your normal skincare routine underneath the petroleum jelly to help trap in moisture.

            The steps are pretty simple:

            1. Wash your face
            2. Moisturize and/or facial oil
            3. Apply the occlusive
            4. Wait about 30 minutes before going to bed

            It helps to apply 30 min to an hour before bed, so the occlusive has a chance to sink into your skin a bit.

            8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Alberta, Canada

            7. Try an omega 3 fatty acid supplement

            Omega 3 fatty acids consist of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), and its two active metabolites, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA).

              • alpha-linolenic acid (ALA)
              • docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)
              • eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)

            Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is found in green leafy vegetables, flaxseed, walnuts, soybean, and canola oils. 

            The body has a minimal ability to convert ALA into DHA and EPA.

            Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are found in fish oils, marine algae and phytoplankton that naturally produce them.

            Fish oil supplements and omega-3 fatty acid supplements contain oil derived from the tissues of oily fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, mackerel, sardine, and anchovy. 

            Fish oil supplements contain a combination of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)—the two main types of omega-3 fatty acids that provide health benefits.

            Can omega 3 fatty acids help with dry skin?

            Supplemental omega 3 fatty acids have been shown to help with dry skin symptoms, including itching in patients with atopic dermatitis (eczema), hemodialysis and end-stage renal disease.

            In 3 clinical trials, patients with atopic dermatitis took daily omega 3 fatty acid doses ranging from 5000 to 8200 mg and found improvement in disease symptoms including itching (Søyland et al, 1994; Koch et al, 2008; Mayser et al, 2002).

            In a clinical trial of 47 hemodialysis patients who had chronic itching, there was a significant improvement in dry skin and itching at 8 weeks of treatment with 6000 mg/d omega 3 fatty acid (Peck et al, 1996).

            Dry skin is an extremely common symptom found in end-stage renal disease patients and has been suggested to be a contributor to pruritis (Shirazian et al, 2017).

            Patients with chronic kidney disease consumed 1000 mg fish oil once daily for 3 months found significantly improved skin hydration on both the face and arms, as well as disease-related symptoms of pruritus (Lin et al, 2022).

            These results suggest a potential promising therapeutic of omega-3 supplementation for improving skin conditions and consequent pruritus symptoms.

            Currently, no study exists recommending the optimal therapeutic dosing of omega 3 fatty acid supplementation for improved skin health. However, significant outcomes were reported with doses ranging from 1200 mg/d EPA + DHA to 18 000 mg/d EPA + DHA (Thomsen et al, 2020).

            Given its high safety profile, low cost, and ease of supplementation, omega 3 fatty acids and fish oils are a reasonable supplement that may benefit patients wishing to improve inflammatory skin conditions through diet (Thomsen et al, 2020). 

            8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Alberta, Canada

            8. Protect your hands

            Your hands are very sensitive to winter weather, and care should be taken to protect them.

              • Use a gentle hand cleanser.
              • Avoid the use of high pH soaps that can worsen dry skin.
              • Use a hand oil or hand cream that is fast absorbing during the day.
              • Try hand treatments with heavier balms and treatments at night.
              • Keep your nails trimmed.
              • Always wear gloves when doing dishes and cleaning. Soaps, bleaches and cleaning solutions are very harsh and can damage your skin.
              • Put sunscreen or sunblock on your hands to protect against UV damage and sunspots. 
              • Wear gloves when you go outside, to protect your hands from sun, wind and cold damage.
            8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Alberta, Canada

            Summary

            'Winter dry skin' is dry skin that develops during the cold winter season.

            Winter dry skin can have a wide spectrum of symptoms - from mild dryness and flaking to severe itching, redness and pain.

            The treatment of winter dry skin can be simple or more complex, depending on the severity of dry skin symptoms.

            8 tips for treating winter dry skin:

              • 1. Use a gentle cleanser for face and body
              • 2. Try an oil cleanser for face
              • 3. Use a moisturizer
              • 4. Wear sunscreen or sunblock
              • 5. Try slugging at night
              • 6. Use a humidifier in your home
              • 7. Take an omega-3 fatty acid supplement
              • 8. Protect your hands

            To protect your skin during the cold winter months, it is recommended to follow a basic skincare routine, including a gentle cleanser, a moisturizer and sunscreen during the day.

            A gentle oil cleanser is recommended for dry skin, as oil cleansers can protect the skin barrier and replenish essential fats in the lipid barrier.

            A moisturizer rich in emollients, humectants and occlusives is essential for treating dry skin. 

            Slugging with an occlusive such as petrolatum at night can help seal in moisture and protect the skin barrier. 

            Essential fatty acids such as topical linoleic acid and dietary supplements with omega-3 fatty acids from fish, can also protect dry skin.

            As for the home environment, humidity should be monitored, and indoor humidity levels should be between 30-50%. A humidifier may be helpful, especially in the bedroom at night. 

            When you go outside, consider additional sun and wind protection, including sunglasses, hat, parasol/umbrella, and gloves. 

            If you have dry skin, you may require a dermatologist's help for dry skin related itching, redness and pain.

            Talk to your doctor about treatments for dry skin. 

             

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            8 Tips for Treating Winter Dry Skin in Alberta, Canada

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            Ishikawa J, Yoshida H, Ito S, Naoe A, Fujimura T, Kitahara T, Takema Y, Zerweck C, Grove GL. Dry skin in the winter is related to the ceramide profile in the stratum corneum and can be improved by treatment with a Eucalyptus extract. J Cosmet Dermatol. 2013 Mar;12(1):3-11.

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